The first Lyme disease patient diagnosed in Minnesota by the Mayo Clinic in 1987, was Linda Hanner who wrote a book about it called: Lyme Disease

The first Lyme disease patient diagnosed in Minnesota by the Mayo Clinic in 1987, was Linda Hanner who wrote a book about it called: Lyme Disease : My search for a diagnosis.
Linda developed rather pronounced Global Cerebral Atrophy from 7 years of untreated bacterial encephalitis. She had a pretty good recovery, but there are still neuro-deficits. I worked with her in the Summers 1974 on a tree farm in Delano MN.
(She might be the first and last Lyme patient diagnosed at Mayo Clinic)
Four years into her battle with Lyme disease Linda Hanner's world had become terror-filled and seemingly hopeless. She had reached the point where she not only longed to die, but to wipe out the fact that she had ever existed.
Linda's story begins in 1981 in the midst of a typically hectic Minnesota summer -- when there was no time to slow down for illness. But the vicious Lyme spirochetes that waged war on her body were unconcerned with her goals and plans. One day Linda was energetic, in constant motion; the next she was knocked off her feet, weak, helpless, confused.
For six years her illness eluded diagnosis. When tests repeatedly failed to reveal any conclusive answers, many doctors insisted her problems must be psychosomatic. They were the professionals, and they seemed so sure...
Before the illness, Linda's faith had been strong. She clung to it, though it seemed to slip away from her grasp with every step further into the wilderness of chronic, undiagnosed illness.
Finally, through the maze of confusion and despair, she found a place of comfort, rest, hope, acceptance. She learned to believe again -- in God and in her own self-worth.
Those who have suffered with Lyme disease, undiagnosed illness, or depression and those who struggle with faith in the midst of pain will identify with Linda's story.


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